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has stressed that the role of the u.s. military would be limited in time and scope. our mission has been to use america's unique capabilities to create the conditions for the no-fly zone and to assist in meeting urgent humanitarian needs. as expected, we're already seeing a significant reduction in the number of u.s. planes involved in our operations as the number planes from other countries increase in numbers. today we are taking the next step. we have agreed, along with our nato allies, to transition command and control for the no-fly zone over libya to nato. all 28 allies have also now authorized military authorities to develop an operations plan for nato to take on the broader civilian protection mission under resolution 1973. nato is well-suited to coordinate this international effort and ensuring that all participating nations are working effectively together toward our shared goals. this coalition includes countries beyond nato including arab partners, and we expect all of them to be providing important political guidance going forward. we have always said that arab leer lea
that it will be brief. he will be speaking from the u.s. army right here in the nation's cap tell and speaking to a country that has mixed feelings about the third military intervention in the past decade and not to convince that this mission has a clear goal or exit strategy. the commander in chief will be speaking about how long and decision to intervening here and the united states and violence against demonstrators in bahrain, syria, another hot spot in the middle east. wolf blitzer will rejoin us before and after the president's big address, including anderson cooper as well as reports from inside experience team and great experience team of analysts. let's begin on the ground in libya. we'll check out the map. one clear result if you take a close look at the air strikes and remove here, i want to go back to march 18th. the day before the strikes began, the day before, you can see right here in red, these were towns just before, just before the strikes began. controlled red meaning controlled by the regime. look where we are today. controlled green. that is controlled by the opposition. t
, briefing them to a conference call about the u.s. nato's agreement to take charge of the no-fly zone. over at the pentagon, a top adral haa story that may indicate colonel gadhafi is getting desperate. >> we received reports today that he has taken to armying what he calls volunteers to fight opposition. i'm not sure whether they truly are volunteers or not and i of these ow many recruits he's going to get but i find it interesting that he may now feel it necessary to seek civilian reinforcements. >> reporter: turning nowo the libyan capital, we're joined by cnn senior correspondent nick robertn who is in tripoli. hi, nick. libyan officials, we understand, took you to eastern tripoli today and showed you theon effes of the coalition bombing campaign. what did you see when you were on the outskirts of the city? >> reporter: well, they wanted to show us civilian casualties which they weren't able to. sho us. they took to us a farm that appeared, part of the farmland area had been struck by a missile. we couldn't tell where the missile had come from or even who had fired it. what we saw when
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
, one possibility an all-out u.s. assault. that i think the president doesn't want to do, promised the nation he wouldn't do that but how do you turn this thing around on the ground? and there's no -- increasingly, the pessimism is setting in on that front. so it's the other alternative. we don't yet see regime change, but as you just reported we've now seen a regime crack and the biggest -- the best bet for the administration increasingly is the regime will crack from within. >> the question there, david, does gadhafi see the defection of a long-term close comfortanf and say i need to read that tea leave as go or lash out and then the question is what happens? and to your point about, you know, maybe the president is being advised he needs to do more than this but now they're telling congress, $40 million a week which is a lot of money but in the scope of a big military intervention a lot less money than iraq or afghanistan. if they commit to that backseat role but then gadhafi sits there, don't they need could to come back and say never mind, we need to up this? >> yeah, i think
of president obama's nationally televised promise that the u.s. military role in libya would be of limited time and limited scope. is that a promise the president can keep if his end game requires gadhafi to go? our senior analyst david gergen is with us, he's advised four u.s. presidents. david, the timing here is horrible for the administration. you can't score this based on one day, but the president of the united states addresses the american people last night and addresses the world. he says the american involvement will be of limited time, of limited scope, and then the day after, the day after, the opposition forces, with whom he has thrown his lot, get routed on the battle field. what's the choice the president faces? >> very difficult choice, john. with the rebels in retreat now and gadhafi forces on the offensive, and we just heard a reporting that the rebels are not going to be satisfied just holding on to the east. they want to go all the way to tripoli. what i think is becoming apparent is they can't get to tripoli unless nato and the united states included go -- you know, do this
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6